Culture Vulture – Ikebana

The Japanese have a very interesting way of calling things, making them appear extraordinary, almost exotic; the word ‘Ikebana’ is something on these lines. It’s an interesting way to start a conversation with the word ‘Ikebana’ innocently dropped into the mix; if you hang out with a few average IQ-ed people, it’s quite possible that 75% (let me make that 80%) of them won’t know what ‘Ikebana’ really is, making you look like the epitome of intelligence. And that’s how you steal the limelight!

“Enough with the suspense already”, you say. “It’s killin’ me”. Yeah, right!

Ikebana is nothing but the Japanese art of flower arrangement. Having been totally Ikebana-illiterate for so long, I accidentally happened to attend a Japanese Cultural Event at the Arts Council, Karachi, Pakistan today. Curiosity got the better of me and upon returning, I came in and wikipedia-ed the word. The Japanese might have difficult words for such things, but it’s rightly so, for this really is a true art-form; I never knew arranging flowers was more than just filling a vase with tap-water and carelessly shoving in a gorgeous floral arrangement you got from that special someone. The thought that goes into making these spectacular works of art and the strict structural guidelines one needs to follow is quite intimidating; needless to say, I’m not taking up Ikebana anytime soon. Having said that, these gorgeous pieces, ranging from a mere inches to a few feet in height, took my breath away.

Enough with the talk; let’s look at some of the masterpieces on display at the exhibition and feast our eyes, shall we?

NOTE: ‘Culture Vulture’ is a new segment I am introducing on my blog; the word Vulture signifies my passion for culture, even if it’s in the form of leftovers or scraps. Plus, the word Vulture in Urdu is used to put emphasis on an existing word (in this case, culture – note that they rhyme).

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